Greased Lightning or Stabbing Fiber with Sharp Needles

Exmoor Horn Sheep

Exmoor Horn Sheep

Balwen Welsh Mountain Sheep

Balwen Welsh Mountain Sheep

 

 

White Bactrian Camel

White Bactrian Camel

 

 

 

Guanaco

Guanaco

Dear Knitters,

In my head I’m such a witty one. I had this snappy song rewrite I was going to wow you with and lead into a charming tale of loops on circulars. It started like this:

Summer knitting, having a blast!
Summer knitting, shawls work up fast!

Then I worked extra hours at the shop and had a better idea. All of my posts so far have been about my knitting, my projects, my philosophy on hobbies. Don’t get me wrong, we will get back to that because I (often) have a lot to say on the subject. But this week, I’m going to showcase some work by Joy Moody, yarn shop manager at Maine Yarn and Fiber Supply (the fiber side of One Lupine), and her latest talent, needle felting, which I know nothing about. Should be fun, right? Well ah, well ah, well ah huh!

Over the winter we hosted a couple of needle felting classes by the gnome woman herself, Jessica Peill-Meininghaus. One was on making three-dimensional gnomes and one was felted greeting cards. Joy took to it like bees to honey and almost immediately we had a dozen of her cards for sale in the shop. She has created different sheep breeds and birds with startling accuracy as well as flowers and nature scenes. She recently increased her canvas size and now has two pictures for sale in the gallery. Here’s what she has to say about her amazing work:

“Rare White Bactrian Camel

Suprising to some, the camelidae family originated on the Great Plains of North America around 40 million years ago. Not the large animals we know today, they were about the size of large jackrabbits. Around 3 million years ago the “New World Camels” migrated to South America. Another group migrated to Asia, across the Bering land bridge, and became known as “Old World Camels.” Alpacas, Llamas, & Vicuna developed from the South American group. They are humpless. The Bactrian (double hump) and Dromedary (single hump) camels developed from the Asian group.

Bactrian camels are both wild and domesticated, the two types being quite different one from the other. Their natural colors are greys, browns, and rarely white. Calves weigh 80-100 pounds, adults weigh up to 1600 pounds and live 40-50 years. Bactrian camels have double coats. The guard hairs are removed first and are used to make waterproof tents and yurts. The medium weight fiber can be spin into belts, halters, ropes, or bags. Baby camel fibers are as fine as cashmere.

I hope you enjoy this rare white Bactrian Camel done in the needle felting method. He appears to be quite happy….maybe because I pulled his face off several times & finally got it right!”

“The Guanaco, pronounced whah-nah-co, is from the South American camelid family, and is related to Llamas, Alpacas, and Vicunas. Mainly found on the high plains and in the mountains, some can now be found in North America, and a herd of about 350 are being raised in Wales.
Rare, exotic Guanaco fiber is scarce, and the fleece has a low yield of about 8 ounces a year. Half of that is guard hair, and the rest then comes from their exquisite undercoat. Measuring less than 14 microns, the undercoat hairs produce an extremely soft, luxurious, and costly fiber.
The Guanaco are inquisitive and will neigh, squeal, and prance if challenged by playful human antics. They grow to the size of a small-to-medium Llama, with white and cinnamon colored hair and grayish faces.
I have derived much pleasure from “painting” the Guanaco in the needle felting method. It is my hope that you enjoy his sweet face, as much as I have enjoyed creating him.”

You can find these and more of Joy's work in our shop. Joy’s success after taking only two classes really showcases the possibilities that can come from a successful class. We’ll have our schedule out next month. Maybe there will be a knitting, needle felting, wet felting, or crochet class that strikes a chord with you. I should probably take a photo editing class. My jpegs are a little crooked.

Nights turn colder, that’s where it ends. Thank you, knitters, for reading again.
Grab your yarn, give it a squeeze. How’s your knitting? Is it a breeze?
Tell me more, tell me more!